Cabin Stove: Small Wood Burning Masonry Heater

by ziggy on December 8, 2011 -- 4 comments -- Follow

I’ve been in contact with Max of Firespeaking recently, and he pointed me to a very interesting masonry heater in response to my question about small masonry stove designs appropriate for small homes.

The Cabin Stove, built at Aprovehco Research Center, is a compact multi-functional wood burning masonry heater. A rather attractive one, I might say, that has cooking and water heating functions, in addition to slow-releasing radiant heat.

I’ve been pondering the possibilities of building a small masonry heater in the future timber frame straw bale house, and this design that Max presented intrigues me.

I urge anyone interested in small wood stoves, or efficient masonry heaters to check out Max’s description of the Cabin Stove. Max has kindly included the construction drawings for the enterprising stove builders among us, as well. Check it out!

p.s. The Firespeaking book store has several nice natural building books and other books about masonry heaters, rocket stoves, and cob ovens.

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Daniel Worth December 10, 2011 at 10:35 am

Have you looked into rocket mass heaters at all?

Joe December 12, 2011 at 1:36 pm

http://www.qualitycountryproducts.com/bakers_choice.shtml

Have you considered a Amish type woodcook stove that can both heat, cook etc.
Or a soapstone cookstove that can cook and heat- I think there is one by Tivoli Spelling?) that can heat (about 875 sq.ft0 and cook

Joe December 12, 2011 at 1:44 pm

http://www.tulikivi.com/en/fireplaces/Bakeovens_and_cookstoves_soapstone_bakeovens_and_cookstoves

Did mispell the name it is tulikivi- not sure about where I read about heating 875 sq.ft.

ziggy December 12, 2011 at 2:07 pm

Daniel: Yup. I’ve built one and since deconstructed it: http://small-scale.net/yearofmud/2010/03/26/deconstructing-the-rocket-stove/

Joe: We won’t be cooking in this house, so a big ol’ Amish stove doesn’t suit us, in this case. It would be ideal to be able to heat up some water, at a minimum, but a full-on cook surface is not practical here.

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